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Making small projects to practice coding is a great way to learn. In fact, it doesn’t even feel like work when I’m utilizing the wonderful RAWG Video Games API to make something that interests me while also sharpening my skills and learning new things. My goal in making this app was to practice with React Router and hooks. I was also able to practice passing props via Links which was something I hadn’t planned on learning.

Before I go any further, here’s the link to the repo on my GitHub. Now let’s get started!

Getting Started

I‘m going to assume that you have some knowledge of using React, therefore I will not be examining every bit of code in the project. Instead, I’ll go over how the app works first. …


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https://thekey.company/products/gmk-dmg?variant=12412178202724

If you were born in the 80s and are anything like me, you probably still have a slight obsession with games from the 8-bit era. As I look back, I actually find myself appreciating the music from old Nintendo games more than the actual game in many cases (there were some bad ones, ok?). Often a melody will get stuck in my head — not knowing for days where it came from until I realize it was from a certain game that I sank countless hours into as a kid.

So when I recently came across a tutorial by Web Dev Simplified on how to make a JavaScript piano, I decided to create it but use Game Boy sounds instead. The Game Boy sample pack I used can be downloaded for free, here. …


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Databases have been used by computers for decades; since 1960 to be exact — when the first one was developed by Charles W. Bachman while working for General Electric. Before database management systems existed, everything was being stored on paper! A database management system (now simply referred to as a database) is essentially a large collection of data that is stored and organized for rapid search and retrieval by a computer. Though they may seem boring, databases keep the world running. Two of the most popular databases used today are SQLite (“sequel-lite”) and PostgreSQL (“post-gres-sequel”). …


Do you like having arguments? Then you’ll love using *splat in Ruby!

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Photo by Markus Spiske from Pexels

One of the many uses of the *splat operator in Ruby is to turn a method’s parameter into a catch-all for extra arguments. In this article, I’m going to explain how I used *splat recently. This example assumes that you have a basic understanding of how classes work in Ruby.

About

Kyle Farmer

Former live audio engineer / production manager currently enrolled in software engineering bootcamp at Flatiron in Chicago.

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